• THE NATURAL ROOM collection is an approach to living through design that respectfully connects us to the natural world. It...

    THE NATURAL ROOM collection is an approach to living through design that respectfully connects us to the natural world. It aims to create interiors that are of our moment – to focus our thoughts and reflect on our lives - while embodying a long-term vision of how we might live in the future.

  •  The collection is composed of hand crafted contemporary design and art pieces that have been created by individuals, often working with local communities. It involves ethical and emotional decisions to use slow grown, organic materials and skill-based craft. The international artist-designer-makers included in the collection embrace these ideologies of sustainability and conscious sourcing to create beautifully crafted furniture pieces and sculptural objects in materials such as wood, jute, sisal, willow, and stoneware. 

     

    Jute and sisal feel like grass between our fingertips, sanded oak like silk, and woven willow crackles under pressure; to stimulate the viewer in ways beyond a purely visual engagement, appealing to an inner need for sensorial invigoration - one that recalls the many pleasures of the natural world. At this moment in time, it feels more pertinent than ever to arrive back at a home which invigorates our senses, calms our minds and connects us to different localities, their makers and communities. Each piece in the collection is imbued with a personality that brings character into our interior spaces. These objects and furniture pieces ask to be treasured as heirlooms in our families over time, instead of falling into the pitfalls and landfills of fast consumerism.  

     

     

    THE NATURAL ROOM: Rethinking our Interior Spaces
    Artists, Critics & Curators Programme - Please email info@sarahmyerscough.com to book on 

    11am Saturday 3rd October
    Peter Marigold in conversation with Emma Crichton-Miller (Editor of The Design Edit)
    Peter Marigold and Emma Crichton-Miller will discuss the value of skill-based processes and cross-cultural collaborations in contemporary design.

    11am Saturday 10th October
    Eleanor Lakelin in conversation with Annie Warburton (CEO of Cockpit Arts) 
    Eleanor Lakelin and Annie Warburton will discuss how the artist sculpts wood to activate important narratives about place and history. They will also reflect how Cockpit Arts has become a vital hub for the survival of Craft industries in London.

    11am Saturday 17th October
    Nic Webb in conversation with Corinne Julius (Critic and Curator of Future Heritage)
    Nic Webb and Corinne Julius will discuss the value of natural materials and hand crafted processes in creating meaningful objects that enrich our home environments.

    11am Saturday 31st October
    Gareth Neal in conversation with Grant Gibson (Critic & Journalist)
    Gareth Neal, a long-time champion of conscious design, will discuss with Grant Gibson how sustainability impacts and challenges his practice. 

     

     

     

     

     

  • Angela Damman

  • Ascension of 13 pushes the aesthetic and technical possibilities of designing with plant fibres, channeling Angela Damman’s background in product innovation into a light installation. The work is made of handcrafted iron and raw henequén fibre; an indigenous plant native to Yucatán.  

     

    Since 2012, Angela has brought her passion for sustainable design to Yucatán in a thriving partnership with talented local artisans. They work side by side to create luxury textiles and products from native plant fibres. The ‘ancianos’, or ancient ones, still use tools and techniques from eras long ago. The preservation of their culture and knowledge is Angela’s ongoing priority; she collaborates with them to breathe new life into their ancient traditions and bring renewed vitality and economic opportunities to their communities. 

  • Ascension 13. Lighting Installation
  • Laura Ellen Bacon

  • ‘I use natural materials, en masse. I hope my language of form may feel strangely familiar to the natural world. It is my goal that my work might bring some intrigue into both natural and built environments, creating work that might serve to remind us that nature can still surprise us.’

     

    Laura Ellen Bacon works with sustainably grown Somerset willow and has developed her own language of tying and interlacing soaked strands of the material to construct biomorphic forms that feel strangely familiar. Laura’s immersive and physically demanding process of making is normally performance and installation based, meaning that her organic bench form represents the beginnings of an entirely new direction in her practice.

     

    Laura’s large-scale works have been included in exhibitions at the Ruthin Arts Centre, Wales; Holburne Museum, Bath; New Art Centre, Wiltshire; Sudeley Castle (Sotheby’s installation); Derby Museum and Art Gallery; and Blackwell – The Arts and Crafts House in Cumbria. In 2017 she was a finalist within the Woman’s Hour Craft Prize at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London and in 2010 she was selected as a Jerwood Contemporary Maker. In 2018 her work inspired the composer Helen Grime, whose resulting three-part movement, ‘Woven Space’ was performed at the Barbican by the London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle. 

  • Fernando Laposse

  • Fernando Laposse considers important environmental concerns through extensive research into the location of materials and their historical and cultural connotations. This has fuelled his passionate interest in sustainability, reversing the loss of biodiversity and community disenfranchisement. His sisal bench presents the material in its raw state to demonstrate the simplicity of process from plant to final product. Fernando harvests and crushes the fibres, combs and knots it by hand to make his hairy furniture pieces. 

     

    Fernando has exhibited in international group shows such as Future Heritage, London (2019); Broken Nature at the Triennale di Milano (2019); Nature at Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian, New York (2019); Food, Bigger than the plate, Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2019); Victor Papenek, The Politics of Design, Vitra Design Museum (2018); and Design after Darwin, Venice Design Biennale (2017). In 2018, he was a Hublot Design Prize finalist and was part of the Beazley Designs of the Year at the Design Museum, London.

    • Fernando Laposse Sisal Bench, 2019 Agave sisal 43 H x 50 W x 150 L cm
      Fernando Laposse
      Sisal Bench, 2019
      Agave sisal
      43 H x 50 W x 150 L cm
    • Fernando Laposse Sisal table, 2019 Sisal and glass 39 H x 130 ø cm
      Fernando Laposse
      Sisal table, 2019
      Sisal and glass
      39 H x 130 ø cm
  • Cristian Mohaded

  • Floating Towers (in simbol) by Cristian Mohaded from cristian mohaded studio on Vimeo.

    Cristian Mohaded hybrid design practice incorporates crafts, industry, tradition, and innovation. The gallery is launching his elliptical ‘Floating Towers’ as part of The Natural Room collection. These are made using hand woven simbol, a plant fibre native to Catamarca, his home province in Argentina. The project began when he met Lorenzo Reyes, a local simbol weed knitter and teacher. Simbol knitting and basket techniques are preserved by local craftsmen who pass their knowledge and skills down through the generations. Mohaded works directly with the local simbol knitters to develop the use of the material into ambitious sculptural forms – while also supporting and preserving the historic knitting skills from his hometown.

     

    Cristian graduated from the National University of Córdoba, Argentina. In 2008, he founded his studio in Milan and now splits his time between Italy and Argentina. He has works in the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, USA; the Musée Les Arts Décoratifs, France; and the Argentine design heritage of Fundación –I–D–A (Research in Argentine Design).  

  • Arko

  • ARKO’s sculptures use rice straw, a by-product of the rice plant. It previously played a significant role in everyday Japanese life and was used to make items such as shoes, coats, blankets and food wrappers. Now its main use is for the production of traditional straw festoons, which are holy ornaments for Shinto New Year ceremonies. It has almost faded out from modern life, despite large volumes of rice crop still being produced for food consumption. ARKO’s practice aims to reinvigorate the material by creating something new with it, to inspire feelings of natural providence, which is often overlooked in today’s digital and commercially-oriented society. 

     

    ARKO has exhibited extensively in Japan and in international group shows such as Changing Attitude, Tokyo (2019); Loewe Baskets, Milan (2019); Object come from the earth, Tokyo (2018); Say No To Limits, Beijing (2007). In 2018, she was shortlisted for the Loewe Craft Prize, exhibited at the Design Museum, London.

    • Arko Untitled, 2020 Rice Straw 43 H x 53 W x 8 D cm
      Arko
      Untitled, 2020
      Rice Straw
      43 H x 53 W x 8 D cm
    • Arko Untitled , 2020 Rice Straw 72 H x 65 W x 7 D cm
      Arko
      Untitled , 2020
      Rice Straw
      72 H x 65 W x 7 D cm
  • Wycliffe Stutchbury

  • Wycliffe Stutchbury respects his material as an elemental record of the British Isles’ natural history. His ambitious wall panels and standing screens are inspired by the countryside he has experienced and lived in over his lifetime; from the Fenlands of East Anglia to the South Downs, where the artist spent his earliest days. This childhood relationship to woodland means he has an intrinsically close bond to his material: holly bush, oak and bogwood express his emotional connection to his subject while acting as an index of place itself. For Wycliffe, the finished piece is always an exploration of landscape: field, furrow and fall line are all embedded in the undulating scenery his work recalls. 

     

    His making process is slow and meditative; delicately hewn tiles of wood are placed by hand to create abstract compositions that are at once emotive, intuitive and conceptual. Patterns emerge in linear forms and subtle tonal changes susurrate across the picture's surface - reminding us of the wood’s creation and guiding us back to place. 

     

    The artist has exhibited extensively in the UK and the US and has significant works in international private collections. He has received several notable awards, including from the Crafts Council UK and the Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers UK. In 2018, Wycliffe was shortlisted for the Loewe Craft Prize.

     

    • Wycliffe Stutchbury Gayles Farm 5, 2020 Discarded oak fencing on cotton hung on 3 section hinged European oak frame 210 H x 210 W cm
      Wycliffe Stutchbury
      Gayles Farm 5, 2020
      Discarded oak fencing on cotton hung on 3 section hinged European oak frame
      210 H x 210 W cm
    • Wycliffe Stutchbury Hundred Foot Drain 10, 2020 Excavated Bog Oak 150 H x 150 W cm
      Wycliffe Stutchbury
      Hundred Foot Drain 10, 2020
      Excavated Bog Oak
      150 H x 150 W cm
  • Tim Johnson

  • Tim Johnson’s Keeping Time baskets, which present natural materials in a direct and honest way, are at their very heart about time. The twining and folding that holds them together conceptually marks increments of being and are therefore a declaration of human presence; ultimately, the maker’s time is kept in the work as a trace of activity. 

     

    The uncommon structures of the baskets recall the historical nature of his process; thatched and piled textiles like this date back to Neolithic times, when they were used in garments and shelters to provide our ancestors with insulation and weather protection. Tim re-presents this traditional way of making and embellishes it with his own innovations and techniques to further explore concepts of containment and protection, material, place and culture.  

     

    Tim Johnson ’s work has been exhibited internationally, including his solo show Lines and Fragments at the Crafts Study Centre, Farnham UK and the  Korbmacher - Museum Dalhausen, Germany (both 2019); Basketry, Ruthin Crafts Centre, Wales (2019) Deeper Voice of Textiles, Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2017); Ports I Man, Museu de la Pauma, Spain (2013/14); Linking, Nationaal Vlechtmuseum, Netherlands (2012); and Cherry Basket, Johannes Larsen Museum, Keretminde, Denmark (2009). 

    • Tim Johnson Keeping Time, 2019 Esparto 25 H x 50 ø cm
      Tim Johnson
      Keeping Time, 2019
      Esparto
      25 H x 50 ø cm
    • Tim Johnson Keeping Time, 2019 Jacinthe 22 H x 32 W x 25 D cm
      Tim Johnson
      Keeping Time, 2019
      Jacinthe
      22 H x 32 W x 25 D cm
    • Tim Johnson Keeping Time, 2019 Reedmace 40 H x 30 ø cm
      Tim Johnson
      Keeping Time, 2019
      Reedmace
      40 H x 30 ø cm
    • Tim Johnson Keeping Time, 2019 Combed Reedmace 30 H x 25 ø cm
      Tim Johnson
      Keeping Time, 2019
      Combed Reedmace
      30 H x 25 ø cm
  • Mami Kato

  • Mami Kato is best known for her sculptural works in rice straw. She uses the material to not only reference her Japanese heritage, but also to highlight the ability of raw materials to provide energy and sustain life on earth. Her work sculpturally captures this natural vitality as it powerfully surges in curves, twists and bulges, with installation pieces appearing to literally pour out from the walls. Through her work, she encourages us to carefully consider the gift of natural sustenance, which will only continue if we respect and nurture a symbiotic and balanced relationship with the earth.

     

    Mami is a Japanese born-artist who now lives and works in Philadelphia in the US. She graduated from Musashino Art University and Tokyo School of Art in Japan and University of the Arts in the US and has since exhibited extensively across the USA and Japan. Mami’s work is part of international private and pubic collections, including the Wu Tung Art Museum, China.  

    • Mami Kato Uro, 2020 Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin 34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
      Mami Kato
      Uro, 2020
      Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin
      34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
    • Mami Kato Uro, 2020 Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin 34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
      Mami Kato
      Uro, 2020
      Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin
      34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
    • Mami Kato Uro, 2020 Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin 34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
      Mami Kato
      Uro, 2020
      Rice stalk, cashew resin, cotton cloth, epoxy resin
      34.5 H x 56 W x 54.5 D cm
  • Alida Kuzemczak-Sayer

  • Alida’s material lexicon is highly tactile, including natural papers, graphite, pigment, salt, thread, ink, wax and raw casts in metal and plaster. Her sculptures often incorporate forms that recall pages, folds, bindings or scrolls. This work addresses the contemporary relationship between heritage and cultural codes, the linguistic qualities of rhythmically recurring forms and the transformative, yet indexical, nature of the cast or the scan. 

     

    Alida holds an MA in Sculpture from the Royal College of Art, London. Her work is included in The Anthony Shaw Collection at York Art Gallery, UK and The Letterform Archive, San Francisco, USA. She has exhibited extensively across the UK and has received public art commissions from the HERILIGION Project at University of East Anglia (2019) and The National Trust and Norwich Contemporary Art Society (2017). Her work was included in the touring exhibition Stereo Type, which showed at the Boston Association of Architects, BSA Space; Ringling College of Art and Design, Sarasota, Florida; Parsons The New School, New York; and De Pauw University, Greencastle, Indiana (2014-16). 

  • Gareth Neal

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    Gareth Neal’s Block III consoles are concerned with the dialogue between historical and contemporary design. They are CNC cut and then hand finished with traditional tools. Block III celebrates the knotted, gnarled crown of an ancient oak tree. Through his progressive digital crafting techniques and intricate hand carving, this usually disregarded section of the tree (unsuitable for cutting standardised planks from) has been given a second life. 

     

    Gareth comments that his studio’s ‘design process is led by an appreciation and respect for the natural environment, and the traditional processes, materials and skills intrinsically linked within it. Everything we design embodies sustainability, through carefully considered material choices to designs that combine historical and contemporary aesthetics to ensure they’ll last a lifetime.’

     

    Gareth graduated from Buckinghamshire University in 1996 with a BA Honours in Furniture Design and Craftsmanship. He has pieces in the public collections of the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; Crafts Council, UK; and Manchester Metropolitan, UK. His work was exhibited in Against the Grain: Wood in Contemporary Art, Craft and Design at the Museum of Arts and Design, USA; Telling Tales and Power of Making at Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; and The State of Things at The Design Museum Holon, Israel. 

    • Gareth Neal Block III (convex), 2019 Oak 80 H x 79 W x 43 D cm
      Gareth Neal
      Block III (convex), 2019
      Oak
      80 H x 79 W x 43 D cm
    • Gareth Neal Block III (concave), 2019 Oak 80 H x 79 W x 36 D cm
      Gareth Neal
      Block III (concave), 2019
      Oak
      80 H x 79 W x 36 D cm
  • Marcin Rusak

  • Marcin Rusak’s perishable vases are organic composites made from waste flowers collected from florists, shellac, beeswax and resin. Marcin comments that: “Decaying and ageing materials have an important place in my practice. I develop them from organic ingredients in order to create objects that have an element of life on their own. Perishable Vases are created as a paradox to examine the way in which we value things around us. We surround ourselves with objects of use, which become irrelevant to us at certain point, but we are stuck with their materiality. Creating something with an aesthetic and emotional value with the constant reality that it might not last forever creates an uncomfortable notion of wanting to preserve it however we can. It creates a nonphysical relationship which lasts while we consciously maintain it. I believe it is the objects we value that will outgrow the everyday and become representatives of our times.”

     

    After studying at the Eindhoven Design Academy in the Netherlands, the designer received his MA in Product Design from London’s Royal College of Art. Since then, he has set up his studio in Swindo Palace, just outside his hometown of Warsaw, Poland. Marcin’s solo exhibition Unnatural Practice will take place in Ordet during Milan Design Week 2021. In 2019, he had a solo exhibition with Sarah Myerscough Gallery at Design Miami and in 2018, his solo exhibition took place at the Horta Museum in Belgium. His work has also been exhibited at the Verbeke Foundation, Belgium; the Toyama Museum of Art and Design, Japan; and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2015). 

    • Marcin Rusak Perishable Vase X 002, 2020 Flowers and natural shellac 40 H x 50 W x 40 D cm
      Marcin Rusak
      Perishable Vase X 002, 2020
      Flowers and natural shellac
      40 H x 50 W x 40 D cm
    • Marcin Rusak Perishable Vase VII 001, 2020 Flowers, clay and natural shellac 40 H x 40 D x 40 H cm
      Marcin Rusak
      Perishable Vase VII 001, 2020
      Flowers, clay and natural shellac
      40 H x 40 D x 40 H cm
    • Marcin Rusak Perishable Vase IV 002, 2020 Flowers and natural shellac 66 H x 30 W x 30 D cm
      Marcin Rusak
      Perishable Vase IV 002, 2020
      Flowers and natural shellac
      66 H x 30 W x 30 D cm
  • Domingos Totora

  • We believe that sustainability happens through actions and not words’ - Domingos Totora

     

    Recycled cardboard serves as the base for Domingos Todos’ work. In a certified sustainable process, the cardboard is cut and treated with glue and agglutination derivatives and transformed into a mouldable cellulose mass. This material serves as a basis for furniture, objects and sculptural pieces. All the works are moulded by hand and then naturally dried in the sun. The beauty of Domingos’ work is not only manifested in the final product but also in his process; from the designer’s philosophy and respect for the environment embedded in his production techniques to the location of his studio in Maria da Fé in the mountainous region of Minas Gerais.

     

    Domingos has exhibited internationally, including in Brazil, the USA, and across Europe. His work was presented at London’s Design Museum as part of the Furniture Designers of the Year exhibition (2012).

     

    • Domingos Tótora Terrao Bench, 2020 Recycled cardboard and natural earth pigment 42 H x 250 L x 44 D cm
      Domingos Tótora
      Terrao Bench, 2020
      Recycled cardboard and natural earth pigment
      42 H x 250 L x 44 D cm
    • Domingos Tótora Âtalho Lounge Chair, 2020 Recycled cardboard 94 H x 99 W x 99 D cm
      Domingos Tótora
      Âtalho Lounge Chair, 2020
      Recycled cardboard
      94 H x 99 W x 99 D cm
    • Domingos Tótora Âmago Sculpture 12, 2020 Recycled cardboard with natural earth pigment 56 H x 32 W x 19 D cm
      Domingos Tótora
      Âmago Sculpture 12, 2020
      Recycled cardboard with natural earth pigment
      56 H x 32 W x 19 D cm
  • Egeværk

  • The concept for Egeværk’s ICE series originated from their deep-rooted connection to the landscape in their native homeland and neighbouring countries, specifically the harsh winter icescapes of Denmark, Sweden and Norway. The designers sought to capture the fluid aesthetics of ice in their opposingly solid medium of Danish Ash wood.  

     

    For months the artists transported huge blocks of ice to their studio to study the melting process under both natural and controlled conditions. Blocks were placed shoulder to shoulder in the workshop or on the harbour front to compare the different melting rates; these were carefully catalogued in photographs, which were then used as inspiration in a series of carved maquettes. The final large-scale furniture pieces are the result of a slow and thoughtful process of making; they embody the language of ice in form and texture, achieved through Egeværk’s gentle and refined carving techniques. 

     

    Kristensen (1985) and Bentzen (1978) were both trained at the esteemed PP Furniture, a Danish joinery established in 1953 and famous for its large portfolio of modern Danish furniture. They are the recipients of many prestigious awards and accolades, including the 2019 Snedkerprisen (the Danish Carpentry Award). Most recently, their work has been selected for the Danish Pavilion in Tokyo during the Olympic Games 2020.

     

    • Egeværk Ice Stool Twist IV, 2020 Danish Ash 42 H x 42 W x 25 cm
      Egeværk
      Ice Stool Twist IV, 2020
      Danish Ash
      42 H x 42 W x 25 cm
    • Egeværk Ice Stool III, 2020 Danish Ash 42 H x 42 W x 25 D cm
      Egeværk
      Ice Stool III, 2020
      Danish Ash
      42 H x 42 W x 25 D cm
    • Egeværk Ice Series Table, 2019 Danish Ash 37 H x 135 W x 155 L cm
      Egeværk
      Ice Series Table, 2019
      Danish Ash
      37 H x 135 W x 155 L cm
  • Eleanor Lakelin

  • ‘I peel back bark to reveal the organic chaos that can exist in the material itself and build up layers of texture through carving and sandblasting. I use the vessel form and surface pattern to explore the layers and fissures between creation and decay and the erosion of nature.’ – Eleanor Lakelin
     
    Engaging in sustainable practices, Eleanor works only with trees grown in Britain and felled due to decay. A deep knowledge and a passionate interest in the natural properties of wood result in forms that seem true to the spirit of the material and which encourage us to look at the complexities of nature with a new perspective. Material is transformed into objects that invite touch and reflection, reminding us of our emotional bond with wood and, in turn, our wider relationship to the elemental earth.
     
    Eleanor's bleached white vessels appear like archaeological objects pulled from the ground; classical forms are referenced and smooth surfaces, reminiscent of ossified matter, rhythmically yield to knotted sections of burr. Her smoky coloured handcarved and sandblasted vessels are created using a special iron solution; these pieces are inspired by the colours of the Upper Mawddach Valley near Dolgellau in Wales which Eleanor often visits, where slate stones are predominant in the iron-rich landscape.
     
    Eleanor’s work is exhibited internationally and is part of prestigious private and museum collections, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; the Museum of London, UK; and the Mint Museum of Craft and Design, USA. She is the recipient of notable awards and commendations, including a QEST Scholarship in 2018; winner of the Bespoke Category of the British Wood Awards in 2017; nomination for the Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize in 2014; and The Cockpit Arts / Worshipful Company of Turners Award in 2011.

    • Eleanor Lakelin Shifting Sands II/19, 2019 Sequoia 29 H x 32 dia cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Shifting Sands II/19, 2019
      Sequoia
      29 H x 32 dia cm
    • Eleanor Lakelin Shifting Sands I/20 (smaller vessel), 2020 Sequoia 27 H x 27 dia cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Shifting Sands I/20 (smaller vessel), 2020
      Sequoia
      27 H x 27 dia cm
    • Eleanor Lakelin Ferrous Rill Vessel I/20, 2020 Sequoia 22 H x 44 dia cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Ferrous Rill Vessel I/20, 2020
      Sequoia
      22 H x 44 dia cm
    • Eleanor Lakelin Voided Vessel I/20, 2020 Horse chestnut burr 16 H x 23 dia cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Voided Vessel I/20, 2020
      Horse chestnut burr
      16 H x 23 dia cm
    • Eleanor Lakelin Citadel IV, 2018 Horse chestnut burr 21 H x 16 dia cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Citadel IV, 2018
      Horse chestnut burr
      21 H x 16 dia cm
    • Eleanor Lakelin Echoes of Amphora – I/20, 2020 Horse Chestnut Burr 50 H x 28 ø cm
      Eleanor Lakelin
      Echoes of Amphora – I/20, 2020
      Horse Chestnut Burr
      50 H x 28 ø cm
  • Peter Marigold

  • Peter’s Cleft series is a collaboration with Japanese master craftsmen, Hinoki Kougei. They first partnered in 2012 for the Japan Creative project at Salone di Mobili in Milan, which brought together Western designers and Japanese craft artisans. Chuzo Tozawa, founder of Hinoki Kougei, proposed they use gigantic split logs to form the sides of their Dodai bench, finished with a covering made from handwoven igusa (rush grass). The result is a rich sensory experience; the cleft planes where the wood has been pulled apart and sanded back are highly tactile, coupled with the appealing organic aromas of Japanese Cypress and igusa grass. Peter’s partnership with Hinoki Kougei has continued in his collaborative project with Chuzo Tozawa’s son, Tadanori Tozawa. Their series of wall cabinets gives a frontal focus to the dramatic cleaving action. Based on the form of traditional medicine cabinets, these pieces are made from different woods, each carefully selected for their special qualities that are accentuated in the clefting process. 

     

    Peter's work is in the public collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK. It has been exhibited internationally, including at MoMA New York, USA; Design Museum Holon, Israel; the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; and 21_21 Design Sight, Japan. Commissions include projects for Bloomberg, UK; The Museum of Childhood, UK; Oyuna (Mongolian Cashmere); Kvadrat, Denmark; and a porcelain collection for Meissen, Germany. 

  • Joe Hogan

  • I was drawn to basketmaking because willow growing provided an opportunity to live rurally and develop a real understanding for a particular place... I take some time each year to try new ideas and to make new designs but I also value repetition and the fluency it develops. You learn to be patient, to work in the present moment and to not prejudge the outcome. For the past ten years or so I have become increasingly interested in making non-functional baskets, some of which involve the use of found pieces of wood. This work is prompted by a desire to develop a deeper connection to the natural world.’ - Joe Hogan

     

     

    Joe Hogan’s studio is based at Loch na Fooey in the West of Ireland. He discovered the area during a cycling trip in the 1970's and was immediately drawn to its natural beauty and the local way of life. He and his wife moved there in 1978 and planted willow in their very first spring, which they have harvested, cut and dried themselves ever since. Joe incorporates locally found materials such as bark, logs, lichen and catkins to make his uniquely sculptural handwoven baskets, for which he has gained international recognition. In 2018, he was shortlisted for the Loewe Craft prize.

    • Joe Hogan A Pod On Old Willow Wood, 2020 Driftwood and Willow 43 H x 65 L x 46 D cm
      Joe Hogan
      A Pod On Old Willow Wood, 2020
      Driftwood and Willow
      43 H x 65 L x 46 D cm
    • Joe Hogan Boat Like Driftwood Pouch with a Fork , 2020 Driftwood and Willow 57 H x 121 L x 62 D cm
      Joe Hogan
      Boat Like Driftwood Pouch with a Fork , 2020
      Driftwood and Willow
      57 H x 121 L x 62 D cm
  • Alison Dickens

  • Alison Dickens makes organic, sculptural forms in willow from sustainable sources in Somerset. She also produces delicate plaited vessels in bark and other plant materials harvested from hedgerows, gardens and roundabouts.

     

    Alison’s baskets are contemporary in form, yet they call on a rich and varied craft tradition. Her pieces visually echo the high and low curves of spare open landscapes: the Yorkshire Dales and Wolds, Norfolk and Suffolk coasts, estuaries and tidal mudflats; and the forms and patterns made by water, wind and wave. Her willow vessels are made using the rope-wale weave, which involves adding a new rod at every stroke and weaving with a bundle of willow. The technique is slow and time-consuming, however the artist comments that, ‘I love the sense of movement it creates and feel it best evokes the landscape forms and forces that guide me.’

     

    Alison was selected for the London Creative Network programme in 2018 and won the Cockpit Arts/ The Worshipful Company of Basketmakers’ Award in 2019. In the same year, her work was included in the major exhibition Basketry - Function and Ornament at Ruthin Craft Centre, Wales.  

  • Felicity Irons / Rush Matters

  • Rush Matters is making new matts and baskets for The Natural Room. Please use the enquiry button below if you would like to receive details once these are available. 

     

    When the last member of Britain's remaining family of rushcutters died in 1994, Felicity Irons stepped in to save the harvesting tradition of the rush weaver. Historically, rush was used as floor covering and was an essential part of the British home. However, as mass produced materials emerged from the Industrial revolution, the demand fell into steep decline. Felicity is now training others in rush harvesting and weaving techniques and revitalising traditional methods with contemporary innovation.

     

    At harvest time, Felicity navigates the Great Ouse and Nene Rivers in an aluminium punt; in a physically demanding process, she plunges a scythe five feet underwater from a standing position to sever the stalks cleanly. The rush, which are dried against hawthorn hedges and in stubble fields, are woven from meat hooks in nine-strand plaits: ‘As the rush is consumed in the plait, new strands are invisibly interwoven, yielding a continuous strip. The width is formed by sewing the strips with jute twine using a sailmaker’s palm’.

     

    Felicity has received a number of significant public commissions from the UK’s National Trust, including an immense 171-foot-by-22-foot mat at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire’s Tudor masterpiece. Museum commissions include the Frick Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, both New York.

  • Felicity Artworks

  • Nic Webb

  • THE NATURAL ROOM presents Nic Webb’s Koru series of sculptures in wood. The word Koru describes the shape of an unfurling fern, an integral symbol of Māori culture. It represents new life, growth and through a perpetual cycle of movement, a return to the beginning.

     

    The series began with a piece of oak in the artist's studio that reminded  him of an ammonite fossil. This inspired the forms of each piece, along with the 'unfurling fern' that he was reading about at the time. Nic also has an interest in philosophies that consider the organic chaos inherent in the underlying structure of the universe, which develops in each thing as a result of its unique environment. This can be seen very clearly in wood grain and the development of trees and is therefore a philosophy that is particularly relevant to Nic's practice. Nic works in a spontaneous way; he let's the branch and grain structure guide him as he works. At the same time he doesn't shy away from articulating his artistic intervention in the natural material. This is communicated through the clean carved lines and polished surfaces - for Nic, it's about using his tools and techniques as an artist to draw out  the natural beauty, so the viewer can see it as richly as possible.

     

    After studying Fine Art at the University of Brighton, Nic spent several years in Cypress before returning to London to work as a set builder. His  studio is now based in the coastal region of East Sussex, UK. His work is  at the forefront of British craft and has been exhibited extensively in the  UK, as well as in the USA. He has pieces in significant international  private collections across the world.

    • Nic Webb Koru II, 2020 Flamed Oak 48.5 H x 36 W x 26 W cm
      Nic Webb
      Koru II, 2020
      Flamed Oak
      48.5 H x 36 W x 26 W cm
    • Nic Webb Koru I, 2020 Flamed Oak 36 H x 20 ø cm
      Nic Webb
      Koru I, 2020
      Flamed Oak
      36 H x 20 ø cm
    • Nic Webb Koru III, 2020 Flamed Oak 52 H x 42 W x 20 D cm
      Nic Webb
      Koru III, 2020
      Flamed Oak
      52 H x 42 W x 20 D cm
  • Ernst Gamperl

  • Master craftsman Ernst Gamperl has revolutionised the practice of wood turning by developing entirely new modes of working that push it to its technical limits. The artist principally uses the mighty European Oak tree and carefully selects his immense logs from sustainable sources – either from trees that could not stand their ground against the wind or were felled due to decay.

     

    Ernst turns the oak when it’s green and supple, to work in dialogue with the wood before arriving at a final shape; he is an expert in its drying properties and prophetically reads its movement as the sculpture finds its undulating form. The artist eschews uniformity and celebrates the imperfections present in the material, which tell the story of the tree’s momentous life and energy; the curved edges and bulges, the projections and indentations that emerge out of the natural deformation of the wood are an essential part of Ernst’s design. These enriching elements draw us ever closer to the piece; the profundity of the work lies in Ernst’s ability to mine the emotional resonance that lies within the wood.

     

    Ernst won the first Loewe Craft Prize in 2017 in recognition of his craftsmanship. His work is part of many international collections, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; Fond National d’art Contemporain France; Museé des Arts Décoratifs de la Ville de Lausanne, Switzerland; The International Design Museum/Neue Sammlung, Germany; Collection Issey Miyake, Japan; and Amorepacific Museum of Art, South Korea. His solo museum exhibition, Dialogue with Wood, opened at the Gewerbemuseum Winterthur in Switzerland in 2019 and toured to the Korean Craft Museum in Spring 2020. 

    • Ernst Gamperl Oak Vessels, 2019 Oak Dimensions variable
      Ernst Gamperl
      Oak Vessels, 2019
      Oak
      Dimensions variable
    • Ernst Gamperl Oak Vessels, 2019 Oak Dimensions variable
      Ernst Gamperl
      Oak Vessels, 2019
      Oak
      Dimensions variable
    • Ernst Gamperl 42/2019//150 MP19, 2019, 2019 Oak 118 H x 34 ø cm
      Ernst Gamperl
      42/2019//150 MP19, 2019, 2019
      Oak
      118 H x 34 ø cm
  • Michael Peterson

  • Michael’s monumental sculptures are inspired by the geographic environment of the American Pacific Northwest. His abstract pieces are powerful expressions of sculptural form and texture, which reflect the artist’s reverence for the natural world.

     

    Michael’s selection and sourcing of wood is a significant step in his process of making. Every few months, Michael and his wife Jean make the 500-mile journey from their home on Lopez Island to Southern Oregon to find the perfect pieces of Madrone Burl wood. He comments that, ‘I’m committing to this material. I don’t want somebody to just send me wood – I really have to make that connection.’ The artist’s bond with his material is augmented in the studio; he spends months working with the pieces, using a range of tools, such as chainsaws, gouges and chisels to hollow out and develop forms that warp in the drying process. Once the wood is dry, Michael uses special surface treatments to draw forth the organic and elemental drama of the grain of the wood. He experiments with spatial relationships between the forms in his collection until he finds the perfect balance for his powerful assemblages. On other occasions, Michael discovers a form with a singularity of character that naturally exists on its own as a sculptural piece.    

     

    Michael’s work has been exhibited in group and solo shows throughout the USA, including Craft Spoken Here at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Revolution in Wood at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. In 2009, his major solo exhibition Michael Peterson: Evolution/Revolution was held at the Bellevue Arts Museum, WA. The artist’s work can be found in the public collections of the Museum of Arts and Design, USA; the Mint Museum of Craft and Design, USA; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, USA; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, USA; and the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK.

    • Michael Peterson New Terrain, 2019 Carved, bleached, pigmented madrone burl 55 H x 38 W x 36 D cm
      Michael Peterson
      New Terrain, 2019
      Carved, bleached, pigmented madrone burl
      55 H x 38 W x 36 D cm
  • Luke Fuller

  • Through his choice of material, Luke is intrinsically connected to the land, and reflects upon clay as, ‘one of the original products of recycling. From mountain top to riverbed, this natural material offers me the chance to engage with the elemental earth.’ His work embodies a raw energetic power; its variegated forms and unbounded textural surfaces are inspired by the parallel layers of rock strata built up over a period of time. This can be closely compared to the artist’s process of compacting and pressing clay layer by layer into a cardboard mould. His technical facility allows him to push the sculptural aspect of his work to new and unexpected forms, which recall naturally wrought compositions of rock and stone risen from the earth. 

     

    Luke studied a BA in 3D Design and Craft from the University of Brighton and graduated from the Ceramics and Glass MA at the UK’s Royal College of Art in 2020. The artist has received a number of prestigious awards and bursaries, including the Nagoya University of Art, Japan, Grand Prize; the UK Business Design Centre Designer of the Year Award; The Anna Maria Desogus Memorial Graduate Award; a Franz Rising Star Scholarship; a Charlotte Fraser Scholarship; and The Richard Seager Bursary Award. He was also a Craeftiga Finalist in association with Hole & Corner.

    • Luke Fuller Bond (Pair), 2020 Stoneware 12.5 H x 12.5 W x 13 D cm each
      Luke Fuller
      Bond (Pair), 2020
      Stoneware
      12.5 H x 12.5 W x 13 D cm each
    • Luke Fuller Hive III, 2019 Stoneware with porcelain 32 H x 22 ø cm
      Luke Fuller
      Hive III, 2019
      Stoneware with porcelain
      32 H x 22 ø cm
  • Diana Scherer

  • Diana Scherer is fascinated by the underground life of plants. The subterranean root system of a plant acts as a type of brain; it navigates and knows what surrounds it by perceiving gravity, moisture and chemicals. The artist first began to apply this "intelligence" of plants in her work in 2015. She wanted to make these hidden processes visible, for them to be appreciated by a wider audience. In collaboration with biologists, Scherer developed a technique to control the growth of plant roots, turning them into an artificial textile. Scherer comments that: “I approach the root system as if it were yarn. For example, the refined, white root structure of grass reminds me of silk and the powerful, yellowish strands of the daisy I compare to wool.”

     

    Diana Scherer has exhibited in international solo and group shows, including in Fashioned from Nature, Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2018/19); A Queen Within – Adorned Archetypes; New Orleans Museum of Art (2018); Earth Matters, Textile Museum Tilburg, Netherlands (2017); Spectrum Crops, Mediamatic Amsterdam, (2017); Springtide, Photography Museum Rotterdam, Netherlands (2017). She published has two books at Van Zoetendaal Publishers; Nurture Studies 2012 and Mädchen 2015. Her work Interwoven has been critically acclaimed and has won the New Material Award at the Dutch Design Week (2016). Her work has also been exhibited at the DHUB Design Museum in Barcelona, Spain and Museum Jan Cunen in Oss, Netherlands.

    • Diana Scherer Exercises in Rootsystem Domestication I, 2020 Grown textile from plant roots 230 H x 65 W cm
      Diana Scherer
      Exercises in Rootsystem Domestication I, 2020
      Grown textile from plant roots
      230 H x 65 W cm
    • Diana Scherer Exercises in Rootsystem Domestication II, 2020 Grown textile from plant roots 75 H x 55 W cm
      Diana Scherer
      Exercises in Rootsystem Domestication II, 2020
      Grown textile from plant roots
      75 H x 55 W cm
  • Max Bainbridge

    • Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found Land Jar, 2020 Spalted Maple 28 H x 32 ø cm
      Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found
      Land Jar, 2020
      Spalted Maple
      28 H x 32 ø cm
    • Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found Land Jar, 2020 Burnt Alder 30 H x 32 ø cm
      Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found
      Land Jar, 2020
      Burnt Alder
      30 H x 32 ø cm
  • Max Bainbridge, one half of Forest + Found, is driven by a desire to create work that explores dialogues between sculpture, and a newfound language of craft. His studio is a space for material experimentation and cross disciplinary collaboration, as well as a platform to explore their individual art practices in wood and textiles.  Bainbridge’s exploration of the living tree is rooted in the physicality of the embodied vessel and carved, object. He seeks to create an artefact where cultural narratives and identity can be challenged and re-written through the physical act of making and their psychological exploration of the natural.

    Max’s work has been exhibited extensively in the UK, including at the Pitts Rivers Museum, Oxford; Yorkshire Sculpture Park; and the Ruthin Crafts Centre, Wales. In 219, Forest + Found were shortlisted for the Jerwood Makers Open.

  • Max Frommeld

  • Max Frommeld's studio specialises in private commissions, self-initiated projects and design work for commercial brands. Max comes from a tradition of working directly with materials and manufacturing processes. Growing up in Ulm, Germany, a region with a legacy of industrial design and manufacturing, encouraged his interest in making and creative problem solving.

     

    In 2004, he moved to London to study product and furniture design at Ravensbourne College of Art and Design. After graduating with a BA Honors he worked in Product Development at Nils Holger Moormann furniture company in Aschau, Germany. He graduated with an MA in Design Products from the Royal College of Art in London in 2011.

    Sarah Myerscough Gallery has specially commissioned Max Frommeld to create an installation piece for FOG. He has used found wood from the JB Blunk property in Northern California, where he lives with his wife Mariah Frommeld for six months of the year. Each item is hand carved at the JB Blunk House utilising an inlay technique with a beautiful medley of wood species, including old growth Redwood, Claro Walnut, Bay Laurel, Red Gum Eucalyptus, lace burl Redwood, plain Eucalyptus, Plum, Elm, Oak, Cherry, Maple, Mahogany.