• We are delighted to present new works by Simon Zsolt József as the next Crafted Collectable. With each Crafted Collectable...

    We are delighted to present new works by Simon Zsolt József as the next Crafted Collectable.

    With each Crafted Collectable launched before Christmas the gallery will make a donation to Crisis Christmas, which supports homeless people on Christmas day and beyond, by giving them a place to stay, essential food and festive treats, health programmes and advice. For more information about the charity, please visit Crisis UK.

    For wrapping and delivery before Christmas, get in touch as soon as possible so we can make early arrangements for you. This includes our forthcoming Crafted Collectables, which are available to acquire now and in the coming weeks. Please see additional artworks here

  • Simon Zsolt József

  • Fascinated by paleontological skeletons and Goetheanism, Simon Zsolt József seeks to create objects that feel as though they have been excavated from a geological dig; the visual language within his pieces is redolent of fossil shapes and prehistoric shell formations. A master in mould-making, his technical ability allows him to push the sculptural aspect of his work to new and unexpected forms, whilst referencing an industrial process of making ceramics. Porcelain slip is allowed to escape through the cracks of the mould to form petal like edges, which simultaneously reveal the complexity of their composite plaster mould.

     

    Born in Hungary in 1973, József studied at the University of Art and Design of Budapest.The artist has received a number of prestigious awards including Special Prize Award from Herend Porcelain Factory at the 5th International Triennial of Silicate Arts, Hungary; 1st Prize in the International Competition for Ceramics in Arts and Design, Italy and a myriad of awards and honourable mentions at World Ceramics Biennale in SouthKorea. His works have been exhibited internationally throughout Europe, USA and Asia, with pieces in significant international private collections across the world.

  • Upcoming Crafted Collectables

    • Luke Fuller Bond (Pair), 2020 Stoneware 12.5 H x 12.5 W x 13 D cm each £950 inc. s/s VAT
      Luke Fuller
      Bond (Pair), 2020
      Stoneware
      12.5 H x 12.5 W x 13 D cm each
      £950 inc. s/s VAT
    • Luke Fuller Header, 2020 Reduction fired stoneware 13 H x 13 D x 13 W cm £650 inc. s/s VAT
      Luke Fuller
      Header, 2020
      Reduction fired stoneware
      13 H x 13 D x 13 W cm
      £650 inc. s/s VAT
    • Luke Fuller Quions, 2020 Stoneware 15 H x 76 W x 15 D cm (made up of 4 individual pieces) £2,200 inc. s/s VAT
      Luke Fuller
      Quions, 2020
      Stoneware
      15 H x 76 W x 15 D cm (made up of 4 individual pieces)
      £2,200 inc. s/s VAT
    • Helen Carnac Large Enamel Vessel, 2019 Vitreous enamel on steel 18 ⌀ cm £1,250 inc. s/s VAT
      Helen Carnac
      Large Enamel Vessel, 2019
      Vitreous enamel on steel
      18 ⌀ cm
      £1,250 inc. s/s VAT
    • Helen Carnac Large Enamel Vessel, 2019 Vitreous enamel on steel 18 ⌀ cm £1,250 inc. s/s VAT
      Helen Carnac
      Large Enamel Vessel, 2019
      Vitreous enamel on steel
      18 ⌀ cm
      £1,250 inc. s/s VAT
    • Helen Carnac Small Enamel Vessel, 2019 Vitreous enamel on steel 13 ⌀ cm £1,000 inc. s/s VAT
      Helen Carnac
      Small Enamel Vessel, 2019
      Vitreous enamel on steel
      13 ⌀ cm
      £1,000 inc. s/s VAT
    • Lucie Gledhill Four Is A Square, 2020 Copper chain 50 H x 58 D cm (when stretched) 6 kg £5,600 inc. s/s VAT
      Lucie Gledhill
      Four Is A Square, 2020
      Copper chain
      50 H x 58 D cm (when stretched)
      6 kg
      £5,600 inc. s/s VAT
  • Other Crafted Collectables

  • Max Bainbridge

    "Turned green (freshly cut) form Alder wood these vessels have been left to dry slowly, developing a subtle warp, making them slightly out of round. One has then been sanded smooth and burnished with leather to develop a soft ceramic-like surface patina. Its partner has been ebonised with an iron solution, and then treated in beeswax to intensify the surface finish."

    • Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found Burnished Alder Jar, 2020 Burnished alder 25 H x 25 ⌀ cm
      Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found
      Burnished Alder Jar, 2020
      Burnished alder
      25 H x 25 ⌀ cm
    • Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found Ebonised Alder Jar, 2020 Ebonised alder 25 H x 25 ⌀ cm
      Max Bainbridge / Forest+Found
      Ebonised Alder Jar, 2020
      Ebonised alder
      25 H x 25 ⌀ cm
  • Gerald Mak

    “The series began with a fascination of the manifold representation of hands, potent for me as a maker having a hands on relationship with the material I work with. I often see these hand motifs as self portraits to a degree, expressions of my own hands drawn from habits and personal relationships. It is about touch, or lack thereof within the context of a pandemic; hand gestures as a communicator that words cannot articulate otherwise” – Gerald Mak

  • Caroline Sharp

    “Events this year are giving us all a chance to pause and reflect. The sustainable approach I take in my practice and my connection to nature’s seasonal shifts has been heightened and reinforced further during this time. These woven seedpod forms are in essence about latent and potential energy. Energy within the soil and earth translated into seeds and shooting growth. The tips of the Birch stems are left exposed respecting the character of the material and to suggest both fragility and transience.” – Caroline Sharp

  • Nic Webb

    These vessels begin in primitive crudeness, move through varying states of function, and evolve or ‘devolve’ towards a delicate border between existence and absence. On the whole, the fire and the wood burn as they wish. As the piece concludes, I intervene, shepherd and finally halt the progress of loss at the place before all remnants of the journey are gone.’ - Nic Webb

    • Nic Webb Douglas Fir, 2020 Douglas Fir, flamed interior 84 H x 57 W x 30 D cm £9,500 inc. s/s VAT
      Nic Webb
      Douglas Fir, 2020
      Douglas Fir, flamed interior
      84 H x 57 W x 30 D cm
      £9,500 inc. s/s VAT
    • Nic Webb Present Form, 2020 Beech 46 H x 66 W x 22 D cm £7,500 inc. s/s VAT
      Nic Webb
      Present Form, 2020
      Beech
      46 H x 66 W x 22 D cm
      £7,500 inc. s/s VAT
  • Marcin Rusak

    'Decaying and ageing materials have an important place in my practice. I develop them from organic ingredients in order to create objects that have an element of life on their own. Perishable Vases are created as a paradox to examine the way in which we value things around us. We surround ourselves with objects of use, which become irrelevant to us at certain point, but we are stuck with their materiality. Creating something with an aesthetic and emotional value with the constant reality that it might not last forever creates an uncomfortable notion of wanting to preserve however we can. It creates a nonphysical relationship which lasts while we consciously maintain it. I believe it is the objects we value that will outgrow the everyday and become representatives of our times.' - Marcin Rusak


    After studying at the Eindhoven Design Academy in the Netherlands, the designer received his MA in Product Design from London’s Royal College of Art. Since then, he has set up his studio in Swindo Palace, just outside his hometown of Warsaw, Poland. Marcin’s solo exhibition Unnatural Practice will take place in Ordet during Milan Design Week 2021. In 2019, he had a solo exhibition with Sarah Myerscough Gallery at Design Miami and in 2018, his solo exhibition took place at the Horta Museum in Belgium. His work has also been exhibited at the Verbeke Foundation,Belgium; the Toyama Museum of Art and Design, Japan; and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2015).

  • Rush Matters

    When the last member of Britain's remaining family of rushcutters died in 1994, Felicity Irons stepped in to save the harvesting tradition of the rush weaver. Historically, rush was used as floor covering and was an essential part of the British home. However, as mass produced materials emerged from the Industrial Revolution, the demand fell into steep decline. Felicity is now training others in rush harvesting and weaving techniques and revitalising traditional methods with contemporary innovation.

     

    At harvest time, Felicity navigates the Great Ouse and Nene Rivers in an aluminium punt; in a physically demanding process, she plunges a scythe five feet underwater from a standing position to sever the stalks cleanly.

    The rush, which are dried against hawthorn hedges and in stubble fields, are woven from meat hooks in nine-strand plaits: ‘As the rush is consumed in the plait, new strands are invisibly interwoven, yielding a continuous strip. The width is formed by sewing the strips with jute twine using a sailmaker’s palm’. Felicity has received a number of significant public commissions from the UK’s National Trust, including an immense 171-foot-by-22-foot mat at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire’s Tudor masterpiece. Museum commissions include the Frick Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

  • Marc Ricourt

    Marc Ricourt draws his inspiration from the ancient utilitarian object of the vessel. He comments that, ‘I’ve based my work around a simple but very essential object, as it was the first tool created and used by mankind… My work on vessels has allowed me to develop a relationship between ancient or geographically remote cultures and civilizations and modern creations. The most important facet of my work is the research and exploration of new forms, colours, textures and finishes.

    • Marc Ricourt 07 Walnut Walnut 39 x 24.5 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      07 Walnut
      Walnut
      39 x 24.5 ø cm
    • Marc Ricourt 08 Walnut Walnut 39.5 x 24.5 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      08 Walnut
      Walnut
      39.5 x 24.5 ø cm
    • Marc Ricourt 04 Lime Tree Lime Tree 39 x 26 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      04 Lime Tree
      Lime Tree
      39 x 26 ø cm
    • Marc Ricourt 05 Beech Beech 36 x 28 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      05 Beech
      Beech
      36 x 28 ø cm
    • Marc Ricourt 07 Beech Beech 44.5 x 28.5 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      07 Beech
      Beech
      44.5 x 28.5 ø cm
    • Marc Ricourt 09 Beech Beech 44 x 29 ø cm
      Marc Ricourt
      09 Beech
      Beech
      44 x 29 ø cm
  • Morten Klitgaard

    Morten Klitgaard's work explores notions of place and reflects on the influential effects of nature on both the landscape and its inhabitants. His pieces appear weatherbeaten, patinated by the rugged Danish coastal landscape the artist grew up in. Oxides, metal pigments and ash are applied during the final heating process, causing the surface of the glass to effervesce and create intricate textures and patterns. The work obscures our perception of material whilst successfully honouring the traditions of glass blowing; it pushes the boundaries of contemporary craft and design. 

    In 2012, Morten graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from The Royal Danish Academy of Art, Bornholm, Denmark. In 2020 his work has been exhibited in major museum shows, including Van Eyck's Colours in Design at Design Museum Gent, Belgium; and Craft from Bornholm, at the Hempel Glasmuseum, Holbæk, Denmark. In 2019 he was shortlisted for the International Exhibitions of Glass Prize in Japan, and for the Stanislav Libenský Award in Prague.

     

    Video credit - Cæciliie Philipa. Photos credit - Dorte Krogh.

    • Morten Klitgaard Origin IV, 2020 Blown glass, hot sculptured Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat. 44 H x 19 ø cm £4,400 inc. VAT
      Morten Klitgaard
      Origin IV, 2020
      Blown glass, hot sculptured
      Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat.
      44 H x 19 ø cm
      £4,400 inc. VAT
    • Morten Klitgaard Origin V, 2020 Blown glass, hot sculptured Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat. 45 H x 18 ø cm £4,400 inc. VAT
      Morten Klitgaard
      Origin V, 2020
      Blown glass, hot sculptured
      Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat.
      45 H x 18 ø cm
      £4,400 inc. VAT
    • Morten Klitgaard Origin VI, 2020 Blown glass, hot sculptured Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat. 43 H x 18 ø cm £4,400 inc. VAT
      Morten Klitgaard
      Origin VI, 2020
      Blown glass, hot sculptured
      Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat.
      43 H x 18 ø cm
      £4,400 inc. VAT
    • Morten Klitgaard Origin VII, 2020 Blown glass, hot sculptured Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat. 46 H x 18 ø cm
      Morten Klitgaard
      Origin VII, 2020
      Blown glass, hot sculptured
      Glass, pigment, and ash added on the last heat.
      46 H x 18 ø cm
  • Christian Burchard

    'I have been working with wood for most of my life. We are comfortable with each other; we have a close relationship and I value that connection immensely. I am curious about what is inside and how it works. At times, I am awed by the story of its history, the tracks that the passing of time have left. I feel driven to expose this beauty. At other times, I am fascinated with its inner structure, its subtle form and spirit'. - Christian Burchard

     

    Christian Burchard uses Pacific Madrone, a tree indigenous to the northwest coast of the United States. In his Cold Mountain studio in Ashland, Oregon, he works with the wood when it is green and supple; as it dries, it warps and contracts according to its grain structure. He makes use of these undulating surfaces to create personality, gestural forms and, when grouping the shapes together, relationships. The cutting edge of the artist’s tools and his process of light sandblasting creates a soft surface texture, akin to satin. 

    Christian began his career as a furniture maker, subsequently studying sculpture and drawing at the Museum School in Boston and then at the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in Vancouver, BC. His work is part of prestigious museum collections across the US, including the Mint Museum of Craft + Design, Charlotte; Museum of Arts & Design, New York: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Bellevue Arts Museum, Bellevue; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC.

  • Junsu Kim

    South Korean artist Junsu Kim creates his organic vessels by stacking thin leather strips in combination, meditatively building the layers with varying thicknesses and subtle tonal differences. With an innate interest for raw material, Junsu began working with metal but became captivated with leather when he participated in workshops with local leather craftsmen in Tuscany, Italy. Junsu seeks to capture a sense of time through his use of material and process; the coils of leather reflect the rings of a tree and the slowness and regenerative qualities of a lifecycle. Each piece has its own rhythm and momentum, reflective of the meandering pace of life. 

    In 2016, Junsu graduated from Kookmin University in Seoul with an MFA in Metalwork & Jewellery. His work has been exhibited extensively in South Korea and shown internationally in Paris and London. In 2019, he was a winner of the Cheongju Craft Biennale Competition and in 2017, he was awarded The Artist of the Year 3rd Prize (Director Prize) at the Craft Trend Fair, organised by KCDF in Seoul, and received the Award of Selection in the Talente Competition, Munich.

    • Junsu Kim Eternal Life, 2019 Leather and natural lacquer 50 H x 38 W x 34 D cm £7,700 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Eternal Life, 2019
      Leather and natural lacquer
      50 H x 38 W x 34 D cm
      £7,700 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl IV, 2017 Leather and natural lacquer 15 H x 37 W x 25 D cm £2,150 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl IV, 2017
      Leather and natural lacquer
      15 H x 37 W x 25 D cm
      £2,150 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Container I, 2017 Leather and natural lacquer 16 H x 31 W x 18 D cm £2,100 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Container I, 2017
      Leather and natural lacquer
      16 H x 31 W x 18 D cm
      £2,100 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Container I, 2018 Leather and natural lacquer 28.5 H x 17.5 W x 14.5 D cm £1,950 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Container I, 2018
      Leather and natural lacquer
      28.5 H x 17.5 W x 14.5 D cm
      £1,950 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl I, 2018 Leather and natural lacquer 12.5 H x 29 ø cm
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl I, 2018
      Leather and natural lacquer
      12.5 H x 29 ø cm
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl II, 2019 Leather and natural lacquer 11 H x 26 W x 32 D cm £1,300 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl II, 2019
      Leather and natural lacquer
      11 H x 26 W x 32 D cm
      £1,300 inc. VAT
  • Alison Dickens

    Alison Dickens makes organic, sculptural forms in willow from sustainable sources in Somerset. She also produces delicate plaited vessels in bark and other plant materials harvested from hedgerows, gardens and roundabouts.

    Alison’s baskets are contemporary in form, yet they call on a rich and varied craft tradition. Her pieces visually echo the high and low curves of spare open landscapes: the Yorkshire Dales and Wolds, Norfolk and made by water, wind and wave. Her willow vessels are made using the rope-wale weave, which involves adding a new rod at every stroke and weaving with a bundle of willow. The technique is slow and time-consuming, however the artist comments that, ‘I love the sense of movement it creates and feel it best evokes the landscape forms and forces that guide me.’

    Alison was selected for the London Creative Network programme in 2018 and won the Cockpit Arts/ The Worshipful Company of Basketmakers’ Award in 2019. In the same year, her work was included in the major exhibition Basketry - Function and Ornament at Ruthin Craft Centre, Wales. 

  • Maisie Broadhead

    Maisie Broadhead has produced special miniature photographic prints of My Bella: The Studio. The artist builds the theatrical set in her London studio, carefully selecting each prop and costume element to build the narrative of the scene. The central figure is played by Maisie's sister and muse, Bella. Maisie comes from a closely-knit family and she often returns to this theme in her work; by placing her relatives in scenes that intertwine the past and present, she highlights the enduring importance of family in our lives. 

     

    Maisie's images unfold like enigmatic ocular novels; scenes are rich with pictorial clues that point to an underlying story, yet these intimations are not enough to reveal the plot in full. Central characters are either lost in a moment of quiet distraction or turned towards us, as if our presence has just disturbed them from their thoughts. Ambiguity is a recurrent theme in Maisie's work; 'there is no easy narrative… in the glimpses we have into each other's lives, knowledge is partial, obscured by our own preconceptions.' (Annie Warburton, Through the Looking Glass: Caroline Broadhead and Maisie Broadhead, The National Glass Centre, UK, 2019).

    In 2013, Maisie was a winner of the Jerwood Makers Open and in 2015 she received an Arts Council England grant for a public commission at the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, UK. Her most recent public commissions have been from the Manchester Art Gallery in 2018 and National Glass Centre in 2019, where her work is held as part of their permanent collection. Maisie has exhibited in major international museum shows, including at the National Gallery, UK; the Fitzwilliam Museum, UK; CaixaForum Barcelona and Madrid, Spain; the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia; and Nationalmuseum, Sweden.

  • Joe Hogan

    I was drawn to basketmaking because willow growing provided an opportunity to live rurally and develop a real understanding for a particular place... I take some time each year to try new ideas and to make new designs but I also value repetition and the fluency it develops. You learn to be patient, to work in the present moment and to not prejudge the outcome. For the past ten years or so I have become increasingly interested in making non-functional baskets, some of which involve the use of found pieces of wood. This work is prompted by a desire to develop a deeper connection to the natural world.’ - Joe Hogan