Crafted Collectables

  • Our new Crafted Collectables series launches an artwork each week from gallery artists and the wider community of artist-designer-makers. We’ve...

    Our new Crafted Collectables series launches an artwork each week from gallery artists and the wider community of artist-designer-makers. We’ve invited them to make a small-scale work that might act as a memento; a piece that can be treasured over a lifetime, nurtured through family generations or gifted in an act of friendship. We believe that within the taxonomy of objecthood, the art object has a unique skill in transferring emotional content; beginning with the maker's intention to express a poetry of being in unity with material, it proposes a focal point upon which memories and ideas can be created, held or restored over time.

    The third in the series is Junsu Kim's handmade leather vessels. 

  • Junsu Kim

  • 'I create unique patterns and textures by layering different types of leather, each with its own particular colour and thickness. The growth and transformation of all living things are influenced by external environmental factors; through this process, my hands have become another external influence. It is without the support of a frame or tools, and only with my bare hands, that these works are created - using different tensions, controlled by the tips of my fingers to piece together the different strips of leather. With my work, I recreate tree rings by compiling these thin leather strips into different shapes and vessels, in the hope of giving infinite life to a material that has already reached its fulfilment.' - Junsu Kim

    • Junsu Kim Eternal Life, 2019 Leather and natural lacquer 50 H x 38 W x 34 D cm £7,700 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Eternal Life, 2019
      Leather and natural lacquer
      50 H x 38 W x 34 D cm
      £7,700 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl IV, 2017 Leather and natural lacquer 15 H x 37 W x 25 D cm £2,150 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl IV, 2017
      Leather and natural lacquer
      15 H x 37 W x 25 D cm
      £2,150 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Container I, 2017 Leather and natural lacquer 16 H x 31 W x 18 D cm £2,100 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Container I, 2017
      Leather and natural lacquer
      16 H x 31 W x 18 D cm
      £2,100 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Container I, 2018 Leather and natural lacquer 28.5 H x 17.5 W x 14.5 D cm £1,950 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Container I, 2018
      Leather and natural lacquer
      28.5 H x 17.5 W x 14.5 D cm
      £1,950 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl I, 2018 Leather and natural lacquer 12.5 H x 29 ø cm £2,350 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl I, 2018
      Leather and natural lacquer
      12.5 H x 29 ø cm
      £2,350 inc. VAT
    • Junsu Kim Leather Bowl II, 2019 Leather and natural lacquer 11 H x 26 W x 32 D cm £1,300 inc. VAT
      Junsu Kim
      Leather Bowl II, 2019
      Leather and natural lacquer
      11 H x 26 W x 32 D cm
      £1,300 inc. VAT
  • South Korean artist Junsu Kim creates his organic vessels by stacking thin leather strips in combination, meditatively building the layers...

    South Korean artist Junsu Kim creates his organic vessels by stacking thin leather strips in combination, meditatively building the layers with varying thicknesses and subtle tonal differences. With an innate interest for raw material, Junsu began working with metal but became captivated with leather when he participated in workshops with local leather craftsmen in Tuscany, Italy. Junsu seeks to capture a sense of time through his use of material and process; the coils of leather reflect the rings of a tree and the slowness and regenerative qualities of a lifecycle. Each piece has its own rhythm and momentum, reflective of the meandering pace of life.

    In 2016, Junsu graduated from Kookmin University in Seoul with an MFA in Metalwork & Jewellery. His work has been exhibited extensively in South Korea and shown internationally in Paris and London. In 2019, he was a winner of the Cheongju Craft Biennale Competition and in 2017, he was awarded The Artist of the Year 3rd Prize (Director Prize) at the Craft Trend Fair, organised by KCDF in Seoul, and received the Award of Selection in the Talente Competition, Munich.

  • Other Crafted Collectables

  • Alison Dickens makes organic, sculptural forms in willow from sustainable sources in Somerset. She also produces delicate plaited vessels in bark and other plant materials harvested from hedgerows, gardens and roundabouts.

    Alison’s baskets are contemporary in form, yet they call on a rich and varied craft tradition. Her pieces visually echo the high and low curves of spare open landscapes: the Yorkshire Dales and Wolds, Norfolk and made by water, wind and wave. Her willow vessels are made using the rope-wale weave, which involves adding a new rod at every stroke and weaving with a bundle of willow. The technique is slow and time-consuming, however the artist comments that, ‘I love the sense of movement it creates and feel it best evokes the landscape forms and forces that guide me.’

    Alison was selected for the London Creative Network programme in 2018 and won the Cockpit Arts/ The Worshipful Company of Basketmakers’ Award in 2019. In the same year, her work was included in the major exhibition Basketry - Function and Ornament at Ruthin Craft Centre, Wales. 

  • Maisie Broadhead has produced special miniature photographic prints of My Bella: The Studio. The artist builds the theatrical set in her London studio, carefully selecting each prop and costume element to build the narrative of the scene. The central figure is played by Maisie's sister and muse, Bella. Maisie comes from a closely-knit family and she often returns to this theme in her work; by placing her relatives in scenes that intertwine the past and present, she highlights the enduring importance of family in our lives. 

     

    Maisie's images unfold like enigmatic ocular novels; scenes are rich with pictorial clues that point to an underlying story, yet these intimations are not enough to reveal the plot in full. Central characters are either lost in a moment of quiet distraction or turned towards us, as if our presence has just disturbed them from their thoughts. Ambiguity is a recurrent theme in Maisie's work; 'there is no easy narrative… in the glimpses we have into each other's lives, knowledge is partial, obscured by our own preconceptions.' (Annie Warburton, Through the Looking Glass: Caroline Broadhead and Maisie Broadhead, The National Glass Centre, UK, 2019).

    In 2013, Maisie was a winner of the Jerwood Makers Open and in 2015 she received an Arts Council England grant for a public commission at the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, UK. Her most recent public commissions have been from the Manchester Art Gallery in 2018 and National Glass Centre in 2019, where her work is held as part of their permanent collection. Maisie has exhibited in major international museum shows, including at the National Gallery, UK; the Fitzwilliam Museum, UK; CaixaForum Barcelona and Madrid, Spain; the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia; and Nationalmuseum, Sweden.